Immigrant Settlement and Integration Resources

Resources & Information for Immigrant Settlement and Integration

Whether you’re a new immigrant to the North Shore or you’re someone who wants to help a new immigrant, NSIIP has a helpful collection of resources, information and answers to many questions.

Click on the drop-down menu to read all of the resources available to you under each category.

DSC_0107

NewToBC

NewToBC partners with libraries and immigrant service providers to develop, deliver, and promote services and resources that support immigrant settlement and integration in communities across the province.

2016: West Vancouver Vital Signs Report

West Vancouver’s Vital Signs is part of a Community Foundations of Canada program that sees Vital Signs reports published each year in approximately 50 communities. The Vital Signs report is a periodic check up that measures the quality of life in Canadian communities, identifies trends, and shares opportunities for action.

2016: North Shore and Sea-to-Sky Vital Signs Report

Vancouver Foundation’s 2016 Vital Signs for North Shore and Sea to Sky was conducted online by 485 residents. This mini report compares the results from North Shore and Sea to Sky with the average response across BC.

Community Health Profiles

Health and lifestyle data from more than 33,000 Lower Mainland adults has been compiled into community profiles to help local governments, community groups, and health agencies on planning decisions and policy development at a local level.

These profiles were developed with the provincial Healthy Families BC strategy in mind which is intended to support communities and local governments in prioritizing health actions in areas (e.g. lifestyle behaviours, built environment, key population segments etc) that will reduce chronic disease and injuries.

Immigrant Services in Your Area

This interactive map helps new immigrant search for free immigrant services in their area.

NewToBC

NewToBC partners with libraries and immigrant service providers to develop, deliver, and promote services and resources that support immigrant settlement and integration in communities across the province.

WelcomeBC

This site offers newcomers and service providers information on a range of topics related to settling and working in B.C.

150 Years of Immigration in Canada

This edition of Statistics Canada’s Canadian Megatrends publication looks at historic patterns in immigration over the past 150 years.

Welcome to Canada

A new, more comprehensive guide and web tool to help newcomers settle and integrate in Canada.

Going to Canada

This is a one-stop, online resource for prospective immigrants and newcomers to Canada. The site, an initiative of the Government of Canada and stakeholders across the country, provides information on visiting, studying or moving to Canada.

Discover Canada

This booklet will help newcomers prepare to become Canadian citizens.

First Peoples: A Guide for Newcomers

This guide provides information about the rich culture, diverse history and experiences of Canada’s First Peoples. It is designed to build a greater understanding between non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal communities.

Immigrant Talk

A web-based storytelling project that allows immigrants to share their stories and dreams. Immigrant talk seeks to enhance awareness about immigrant experiences and to promote communication – a barrier faced by many newcomers.

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

CIC provides information about citizenship and immigration to Canada. The site has a section called “Newcomers to Canada” that includes immigrant stories. It also has a section called “True or False,” which corrects myths related to refugees, immigrants, and citizenship.

Who do I need to show my Social Insurance Number (SIN) to?

Do not give your Social Insurance Number (SIN) out to just anyone! It is a confidential number. Visit Settlement.org for tips on how to protect your confidential information.

AMSSA, Affiliation of Multicultural Societies and Service Agencies of BC

AMSSA is an affiliation of more than 80 multicultural agencies that provide immigrant settlement and multicultural services in communities throughout B.C. This site provides settlement, integration and information related to multiculturalism, multicultural health, anti-racism and human rights.

Safe Harbour: Respect for All Program

The Affiliation of Multicultural Societies and Service Agencies of BC (AMSSA) is an organization dedicated to ensuring B.C. is a just and equitable place to live. The Safe Harbour: Respect for All Program focuses on creating opportunities for businesses, institutions and municipalities to support and celebrate diversity.

Canada Gazette

The official newspaper of the Government of Canada, first published in 1841, continues to provide Canadians with access to information about laws and regulations that govern their daily lives.

Bridge Clinic for Refugees

Since 2004, Vancouver Coastal Health’s Bridge Clinic has been the only service within BC to provide for the the health assessments and primary health care for refugees upon arrival to Vancouver. They continue to accept new clients until August 18, 2017 and will be creating a customized transition care plan for each current client. For more information, contact Jill doctoroff, Manager for Bridge Clinic, at 604-833-0192.

 

Information for people considering making a refugee claim in Canada entering from the USA

The Canadian Council for refugees has produced a document with general information for people considering making a refugee claim in Canada entering from the USA.

Trump Executive Order on Refugees and Travel Ban: A Brief Review

The Migration Policy Institute has produced a short information sheet explaining the changes made by the January 27 executive order in the U.S.

Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program – Sponsorship Agreement Holders

The Government of Canada is working with Canadians to welcome 25,000 Syrian refugees to Canada. Find out how Canada is helping Syrian refugees and what Canadians can do to help.

2017 Onboarding Syrian Refugees: A Toolkit for Employers

Revised edition: The purpose of the Toolkit is to assist BC employers to better recruit, hire, onboard and retain a diverse workforce that includes Syrian refugees. It will equip you with knowledge of culturally sensitive hiring and retention practices and will boost your ability to create more inclusive workplaces.

READY for my REFUGEE HEARING

Ready For My Refugee Hearing aims to empower every person seeking refugee protection in Canada to be as prepared as possible for their refugee hearing.

Report: Refugees Work: A humanitarian investment that yields economic dividends – TENT & OPEN

This report is a comprehensive, international study of how refugees can contribute to advanced economies. The return on investing in refugees has been calculated using International Monetary Fund (IMF) estimates of the economic impact of asylum seekers and refugees on the European Union.

Report: 2016 Employer Forum Final Report

As a part of the Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series, this study examines education and labour market outcomes of immigrants who came to Canada under the age of 18, when they were aged 25 to 44. The educational attainment and earnings of immigrants who arrived in Canada before age 18 differ considerably by admission class.

Educational and Labour Market Outcomes of Childhood Immigrants by Admission Class

The report of the Immigrant Employment Council of BC’s 2016 Employer Forum includes key themes arising from the forum, summaries of presentations and discussions, and recommendations for IECBC and businesses themselves.

Notice: Changes to the Interim Federal Health Program – IRCC

On April 1, 2016, the Interim Federal Health Program was restored to pre-2012 levels of coverage for all beneficiaries. Here is some important information about this change and what it means.

Resources and Help for Syrian Refugees

A list of useful resources for the North Shore residents who want to know how they can help Syrian refugees.

Syrian Refugee Resettlement

A list of useful resources related to the resettlement of Syrian refugees in British Columbia.

ISSofBC Refugee Readiness Hub

To assist and empower individuals and refugee-serving organizations to help in the resettlement process, ISSofBC in partnership with the Province of British Columbia have created this online resource hub. It includes ISSofBC Refugee Newsletters.

Population Profile: Syrian Refugees

Information on demographics and health characteristics of Syrian refugees.

From Crisis to Community: Syrian Refugees and BC Economy

It provides a very positive view of the impact of this group on our communities.

CARING FOR SYRIAN REFUGEE CHILDREN

A program guide for welcoming young children and their family.

Students from Refugee Backgrounds: A Guide for Teachers and Schools

This guide is for teachers and other school staff. It has three goals: 1) to provide background information about those with refugee experience; 2) to support all school staff in their work with children and youth from refugee backgrounds; and 3) to offer strategies for teachers working with these children and youth.

Refugee Health – Vancouver | A practical resource to support clinicians who provide care to refugees in British Columbia

The site provides information on what healthcare services are available in different languages, cultural profiles of some of our largest refugee populations, common medical issues, etc.

Promising practices for a coordinated response to refugee mental health – Mental Health Commission of Canada

A roundtable of key government representatives shared best and promising practices towards a coordinated mental health response for refugees settling in Canada.

Website for Volunteers Working with Refugees – Centre for Canadian Langauge Benchmarks

Managers of language programs can direct volunteers working with refugees to this resource page from the Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks to better support refugees in the classroom.

 

Newcomer Housing: Barriers, needs, and experiences

This issue of Migration Matters focuses on housing for newcomers to British Columbia. It explores the definition of acceptable housing in the Canadian context and identifies the types of barriers that newcomers may face in securing acceptable housing. It gives an overview of some of the key issues related to housing for newcomers and provides a list of resources for clients.

Housing for Newcomers

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, the Government of Canada’s national housing agency, provides newcomers with housing information to help them make decisions and find a safe, affordable home for your family. Visit Housing for Newcomers page to use the guides, fact sheets and videos — available in eight languages.

Renting Your First Home In Canada: What newcomers need to know

The guide explains types of rental housing, rights and responsibilities, how to find a place and a glossary of terms.

Buying Your First Home in Canada: What newcomers need to Know

The guide explains a step by step process and includes a variety of fact sheets and tools that cover mortgages, credit report and mortgage fraud.

Report: Canadian Housing Observer (2014)

This report describes demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of newcomers to Canada, examines where they are choosing to live, and reviews their housing choices and other aspects of their living conditions.

Fair PharmaCare Plan

The Fair PharmaCare plan helps British Columbians with the cost of eligible prescription drugs and designated medical supplies. If you are a B.C. resident who is enrolled with the Medical Services Plan (MSP), register your family to receive your maximum assistance under Fair PharmaCare.

BC HealthGuide Handbook in Chinese, Farsi, French, Punjabi

The BC HealthGuide Handbook has comprehensive information on how to recognize and manage common health concerns. Find treatment options, learn how to prevent illness and when to seek help from a health professional. The guide’s topics are relevant to people of all ages.

MPI_Understanding and Addressing Public Anxiety about Immigration

This report outlines and analyzes the factors that can set the stage for public anxiety about immigration and offers policymakers a set of strategies to respond to these concerns.

Refugee Health – Vancouver | A practical resource to support clinicians who provide care to refugees in British Columbia

The site provides information on what healthcare services are available in different languages, cultural profiles of some of our largest refugee populations, common medical issues, etc.

Support for Substance Abuse

This section of the AMSSA website provides resources on the topic of substance abuse with resources available in multiple languages. It includes BC Resources, Canadian Resources, International Resources, Quit Smoking, Alcohol, Opiates.

Resource: Beyond Trauma: Language Learning Strategies for New Canadians Living with Trauma – LISTN

This guide provides approaches, strategies, and language goals for the English as an Additional Language student who has experienced trauma. There is a teachers’ guide and student materials for each of the three themes which are divided into three distinct units. These units consist of strategies and approaches to support people with trauma. The strategies and approaches offer instruction, things to consider, and activities and techniques to support your work as a teacher in the English as a Additional Language (EAL) profession.

Implicit Associations Test

This test will make you aware of your own cultural biases, prejudices and implicit social attitudes.

Good Intentions

An examination of attitudes on immigration and experiences of racial discrimination in British Columbia.

Neonology Tool Kit

This toolkit is intended to inspire communities to engage their youth in dialogues about racism and discrimination.

RESEARCH REPORT: Do Large Employers Treat Racial Minorities more Fairly? A New Analysis of Canadian Field Experiment Data

January 2017 – This study examines the extent of discrimination against skilled immigrants from Asian backgrounds in Canada today, and asks whether this type of discrimination varies according to types of employers.

Handbook: Volunteer Management Handbook: A resource for service-providing organizations assisting newcomers to Canada – Volunteer Canada

This handbook provides a general overview of the volunteer management process with a focus on volunteers supporting newcomers.

Educators’ Guide: Helping Students Deal with Trauma Related to Geopolitical Violence and Islamaphobia

This guide created by NCCM and ISSA aims to help educators  the assess, assist and support students dealing with grief, fear and confusion as a result of Islamophobia and geopolitical issues

Embracing Diversity: Songs and Rhymes in 15 Languages

This community resource has videos of children’s songs and rhymes in 15 languages with translations and cultural interpretations.

Onboarding Syrian Refugees: A Toolkit for Employers

The purpose of the Toolkit is to assist BC employers to better recruit, hire, onboard and retain a diverse workforce that includes Syrian refugees. It will equip you with knowledge of culturally sensitive hiring and retention practices and will boost your ability to create more inclusive workplaces.

2016 Report: What’s So Special about Canada?: Understanding the Resilience of Immigration and Multiculturalism – Migration Policy Instutute

This report explores Canada’s apparently unique attitude toward immigration and diversity by presenting a snapshot of the country’s public opinion polling on immigration, and discussing the matrix of social policies, institutions, and institutional practices that have driven this positive consensus.

Report: 2016 Survey of Muslims in Canada 2016 Final Reports Institute

This survey examines the relationship between Canadian Muslims and Canadian society-at-large. The results show that Muslims as a whole are embracing Canada’s diversity, democracy and freedoms, and feeling more positive about the country than a decade ago.

Managing Religious Difference in North America and Europe

This policy brief focuses on the different policy frameworks and practices governing Muslim integration in North America and Europe.

Report: 2016 Employer Forum Final Report

As a part of the Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series, this study examines education and labour market outcomes of immigrants who came to Canada under the age of 18, when they were aged 25 to 44. The educational attainment and earnings of immigrants who arrived in Canada before age 18 differ considerably by admission class.

Educational and Labour Market Outcomes of Childhood Immigrants by Admission Class

The report of the Immigrant Employment Council of BC’s 2016 Employer Forum includes key themes arising from the forum, summaries of presentations and discussions, and recommendations for IECBC and businesses themselves.

Guide: Ethnic Media & Diversity Style Guide, by New Canadian Media

This style guide was created by New Canadian Media (NCM) to provide media organizations with clear and standardized spellings and definitions for specific terms used in Canada’s diverse communities. NCM’s goal is that this guide will serve as a source that helps contribute to the promotion of more accurate and inclusive reporting when referencing diverse communities in the media. Though produced for media organizations, the guide is useful in general for helping people learn what words are politically correct or considered acceptable, and which should be avoided when communicating with others.

Survival to Success: Transforming Immigrant Outcomes

This report explores ways to improve the process of getting internationally trained immigrants into the Canadian labour force. The report looks at current barriers and makes a number of recommendations such as developing pan-Canadian standards for occupations so that people can assess their credentials before moving to Canada, and developing a broader strategy for alternative careers with more regulator involvement.

Immigration Beyond MTV

This research seeks to contribute to a better understanding of immigrants’ paths to social and occupational integration as well as to share best practices pertaining to the employment integration of newcomers outside urban hubs.

A New Residential Order?

Research considers the social geography of visible minority and religious groups in Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver based on 2031 Statistics Canada projections.

Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration, 2016

Every year, Canada’s Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) is required to table an annual report in Parliament on the department’s immigration activities and initiatives. The report focuses on the selection of foreign nationals as permanent and temporary residents during the preceding calendar year. It also includes an overview of federal/provincial/territorial agreements and joint initiatives, as well as a gender-based analysis of the impact of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA). In addition, the report serves as a vehicle for announcing Canada’s immigration plan for the upcoming year.

An Overview of Discourses of Skilled Immigrants and “Canadian Experience”: An English-Language Print Media Analysis

This report looks at how English-language print media in Toronto, Ontario represents immigrants largely as a problem to be solved within a legal and social policy context.

New Immigrants’ Assessments of Their Life in Canada

This paper considers how immigrants, who arrived between 2000 and 2001, assess their level of satisfaction with their lives in Canada.

An Analysis of Immigrant Attraction and Retention Patterns Among Western Canadian CMAs

This paper evaluates data and factors that determine why immigrants move to mid-sized cities in Canada’s Prairie Provinces.

Immigration and Diversity: Population Projections for Canada and its Regions (2011-2036)

This study finds that the diversity of Canada’s population will continue to increase significantly during the next two decades, especially within certain census metropolitan areas, according to new projections of the country’s ethnocultural makeup.

The Economic Integration of Immigrants in Metropolitan Vancouver

This study looks at the impact of immigration on Vancouver’s economy. It argues that Vancouver would be less connected in the global economy with fewer immigrants. The report examines characteristics like education, language ability, year of arrival, gender, age and country of origin to evaluate how immigrants change the city’s economy.

Insights on Diversity in Leadership – Learnings from the Toronto Region (Final Report)

This document contains a summary of findings by DiverseCity, an initiative to track diversity in leadership in Toronto, since 2008. It also breaks down the results of a 2013 public opinion poll of residents living in municipalities across the Greater Toronto Area on the topic of diversity in leadership.

Best Practices in Settlement Services

This section of Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s website provides information on best practices used by settlement service providers in the country and around the world. It also seeks to promote innovative ways to help immigrants integrate into their new communities.

Smart Inclusive Cities: How New Apps, Big Data, and Collaborative Technologies Are Transforming Immigrant Integration

This report from the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) looks at how smartphone access to city services can help immigrants overcome language barriers and increase their participation in municipal affairs.

DiverseCity Counts

This section of DiverseCity’s website features research that studies the levels and impact of diversity in leadership. It evaluates the representation of visible minorities and looks at under-represented immigrants across sectors. It then identifies areas of progress and areas where work still needs to be done.

International Migration Outlook 2013

This publication presents a broad overview of international migration patterns and policies, the impact of the economic crisis on immigrant employment, the fiscal impact of immigration on Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, discrimination against immigrants in OECD countries, developments in international migration movements and recent statistics on immigrant flows.

Cultural Diversity Awards

This website provides a list of local and national cultural diversity awards. These awards help businesses gain recognition for their work in implementing culturally diverse initiatives.

Award Winning Cultural Diversity Practices

A list of examples of best practices of local and national cultural diversity award winners.

 

WorkBC

Workbc.ca, a website run by the provincial government, connects British Columbians with the labour market. It can help people find jobs and improve their skills and help employers fill positions with the right candidates. It also includes reports, publications and statistics on employment in the province.

WorkBC Employment Services Centre

This interactive map helps job seekers search for WorkBC Employment Services Centres in their communities. These centres offer job search and work experience placement help, personal employment planning and skills assessment.

Skills Connect for Immigrants Program

The Skills Connect program assists newcomers in finding employment related to their fields. The website seeks to help skilled immigrants obtain work that makes use of their pre-arrival skills and qualifications. Language, Canadian work experience and non-recognition of qualifications can prevent newcomers from finding meaningful work. This program helps immigrants to successfully navigate the labour market.

Planning to Work in British Columbia? An Essential Workbook for Newcomers

This workbook was created for internationally trained individuals who are thinking about moving to the Canadian province of British Columbia as well as those who have recently come to B.C. The guide contains useful information about settlement services and programs, education, laws, housing, health care and health insurance, driver’s licence, banking, income and property tax, government benefits, English language training and job search tips.

Occupational Guides for Immigrants

The Occupational Guides for Immigrants helps newcomers understand how their occupations are practiced in British Columbia. The guides also include information on the steps that immigrants can take to find jobs that match their skills, training and experience.

Skilled Immigrant InfoCentre

The Skilled Immigrant InfoCentre is a free service set up to help newcomers find the information they need to get jobs in their fields of education and experience. The website includes information about wages/salaries, industry associations, employment outlook, networking, internships, workplace culture, avoiding employment scams and more.

Perceptions of Employment Barriers and Solutions

The Perceptions of Employment Barriers and Solutions study explored the perceptions of challenges newcomers face in finding and retaining employment. The report offers recommendations to employers, the settlement sector, governments, and newcomers on how to improve employment outcomes for skilled immigrants.

Assisting Local Leaders with Immigrant Employment Strategies (ALLIES)

This organization supports local efforts in Canadian cities to help immigrants find suitable employment.

Get in the Know

Get in the Know provides the information, tools, tips, strategies and resources that employers need to make their business welcoming and inclusive. Resources and tools for immigrant job seekers are also available on this website.

The Hire Guide – Helping BC’s Construction Employers Connect with New Canadian Skill Sets

This new guide takes employers through recruitment, hiring and retention best practices. Thousands of construction projects, large and small, worth over $195 billion, are planned for British Columbia. But skilled workers are in short supply. This guide helps employers understand labour challenges, find out how skilled, new Canadians can help, and connects employers with potential workers.

Path2Work Program

Path2Work is a pan-Canadian effort to provide no-cost job referral services to help match internationally trained engineers (ITEs), technicians and technologists (ITTs) with jobs. This program, which is offered in British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec, seeks to help newcomers receive required Canadian experience and accreditation.

WhoPlusYou – Precision Matching for people, employers and communities

WhoPlusYou is an employment website that works to match the right talent with the right opportunities.

IEP Guide to the ICT Sector

This guide offers tips and statistics about the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) sector in Canada. It serves as a reference for Internationally Educated Professionals (IEPs) who are looking to work in Canada’s ICT sector.

Report: 2016 Employer Forum Final Report

As a part of the Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series, this study examines education and labour market outcomes of immigrants who came to Canada under the age of 18, when they were aged 25 to 44. The educational attainment and earnings of immigrants who arrived in Canada before age 18 differ considerably by admission class.

Educational and Labour Market Outcomes of Childhood Immigrants by Admission Class

The report of the Immigrant Employment Council of BC’s 2016 Employer Forum includes key themes arising from the forum, summaries of presentations and discussions, and recommendations for IECBC and businesses themselves.

Global Talent Connections – Information and Communications Technology Council

The Global Talent Connections program connects employers with Internationally Educated Professionals (IEPs) who are within months of arriving in the country. Canada is experiencing a shortage of workers in the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) sector. This program will help employers recruit qualified candidates, reduce the amount of time spent on screening applicants, make it easier to hire international talent and much more.

Ottawa World Skills

World Skills Employment Centre is an award winning leader in the support and promotion of newcomer talent, providing resources for the employers and newcomers.

Immigrant Employment Council of BC (IEC BC)

The goal of IEC BC is to connect more immigrants to employment that reflects their knowledge and experience. This site provides a list of links to assist new immigrants with finding jobs and developing their careers.

Technology Registrations Canada (TRC)

The Technology Registrations Canada (TRC) website helps qualified individuals become certified and registered as career professionals in Canada.

Workshop Online – Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC)

ICTC’s online workshops provide essential knowledge about working in Canada (including the process of coming to Canada), what Canadian ICT employers need and resources available to develop technical, business, language, and workplace communication competencies.

Understanding Workplace Values Around the World

Technology allows us to work closely with people located around the world. This has many benefits, but it can also be frustrating due to language and cultural differences. This website provides information and tips on how to communicate effectively in a global age.

Canada’s Best Diversity Employers

For the past eight years, Canada’s Best Diversity Employers competition has recognized employers across Canada that have exceptional workplace diversity and inclusiveness programs. The competition evaluates initiatives in five employee groups: women, visible minorities, people with disabilities, Aboriginal peoples and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people.

BC’s Top Employers

BC’s Top Employers is an annual competition organized by the editors of Canada’s Top 100 Employers. This special designation recognizes the British Columbia employers that lead their industries in offering exceptional places to work.

Tackling Brain Waste: Strategies to Improve the Recognition of Immigrants’ Foreign Qualifications

The report examines the barriers that immigrants face in having their professional skills and experience recognized in their host countries. It also looks at the policies that immigrant-receiving countries have introduced to improve the recognition of foreign qualifications and experience. The report defines recognition, breaks down how foreign credentials are assessed, examines cooperative policies and agreements and suggests what governments can do to help.

Immigrants Working in Regulated Occupations

This study examines the extent to which immigrants, in 2006, with a field of study that typically leads to a regulated occupation were working in that occupation.

Hays Global Skills Index 2014

This index is an in-depth review of the global labour market – covering 31 key economic markets.

BC Employer Consultation Report: Recruiting & Retaining Immigrant Talent

This study was commissioned by the Immigrant Employment Council of British Columbia to evaluate how well B.C. employers recruit and retain immigrant talent. The report also looks at the challenges faced by employers when it comes to retaining skilled immigrant employees.

Skills For Growth, British Columbia’s Labour Market Strategy to 2020

This report outlines the province’s labour market strategy to 2020. There will be an estimated 1.1 million job opening is B.C. in the next decade, but only 650,000 young people will graduate and fill those jobs. For this reason, the province needs to continue to make itself a desirable destination for skilled workers. This report looks at B.C.’s economy, labour market outlook and challenges, aging workforce, global competition for talent, education and training, priorities and more.

‘Talentism,’ Mobility and Migration: Implications for BC’s Labour Market

While the debate continues on global talent versus local hiring, this report argues that Canada and British Columbia (BC) need both. To fill jobs, businesses must seek out British Columbians and out-of-province and international workers at the same time.

Where have the Jobs Been Going in the Lower Mainland?

A snapshot of jobs in the Lower Mainland from the Census and NHS tabulate employment data.

The Canadian Immigrant Labour Market (2008-2011)

This study uses statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (2008-2011) to compare the unemployment and employment rates of immigrants to that of their Canadian-born counterparts.

How is Promotion in the Workforce Affected by Nativity, Period of Immigration, Ethnicity, Gender, Education, Occupation and Employment Tenure?

This study looks at how ethnicity, race, gender, country of origin and level of education play a role in whether or not immigrants receive promotions in the Canadian workforce.

Wage Gap Between Immigrants and Native-born Persists After 20 Years in Canada

This article analyzes the employment dynamics of a specific cohort of immigrant and native-born workers over a 20-year period from 1991 to 2010. It then considers how the initial differences in earnings and pension coverage between the two groups narrowed during this period.

People Without Jobs, Jobs Without People

This report analyzes the gaps between the labour force and job opportunities in Canada. Canada’s population is aging, which means there will be a significant decline in the proportion of the population in its prime working years. Increasing immigration has often been suggested as a means of increasing the total number of the workers.

Outsmarting Our Brains: Overcoming Hidden Biases to Harness Diversity’s True Potential

This report by Ernst & Young and RBC, found that leaders who agree with the need for diversity in the workforce may be unconsciously stifling diversity in their organizations due to hidden biases. These biases include physical characteristics like gender, race, ethnicity and age as well as personality and experiences. It found that with a conscious effort, though, leaders can overcome these biases.

New report: Government as Employer of Skilled Immigrants

This research found that immigrants are half as likely to work in the public sector than their Canadian-born counterparts. The report looks at the reasons why this might be happening. The federal, provincial and municipal governments employ 3.6 million people, making them the largest employers in Canada.

Trending jobs for Canadian Immigrants in 2013

This report helps immigrants identify employment prospects and evaluate the lifestyles that different jobs can afford them and their families. It also identifies natural resources, construction and healthcare as the three industries that are expected to experience growth in the coming years.

The Benefits of Hiring Skilled Immigrants – Video Series

In this three-part, audio-visual series, leading employers explain the benefits of hiring skilled immigrant talent. The series includes advice from large employers like CIBC and KPMG and smaller organizations like Advanced Precision about how they have hired and managed diverse talent.

How does Full/Part-time Employment Status Affect Labour Market Outcomes of Immigrants Over Time?

This study looks at how continuous employment during an immigrant’s first four years in Canada affects their hourly wages, levels of job satisfaction, education mismatch and post-migration education and training. It found that immigrants who are continuously employed in full-time jobs have higher hourly wages, are more likely to have jobs that match their fields of study and report higher levels of job satisfaction than those working part-time.

The Results Are In: Mentoring Improves Employment Outcomes for Skilled Immigrants

This study involved surveying skilled immigrants who have participated in mentoring programs in eight Canadian cities between February 2010 and 2012 to determine their effectiveness. It found that the mentoring process improved the employment situations of mentees, helped them increase their earnings and gain a better understanding of Canadian workplace culture.

Immigrants in Self-Employment

This study examines immigrant self-employment trends in Canada. It compares immigrant self-employment rates to Canadian-born self-employment rates, using Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (1981-2010) and Survey of Self-Employment (2000).

Why do Some Employers Prefer to Interview Matthew but Not Samir? New Evidence from Toronto, Montreal

Research sponsored by Metropolis British Columbia in 2009 examined thousands of resumes sent in response to online job postings across Toronto to investigate why Canadian immigrants struggle in the labour market. The findings suggested significant discrimination by name ethnicity and city of experience. This follow-up study focuses on understanding why this discrimination occurs.

Jobs in Canada: Where, What and For Whom?

This TD Economics report debunks predictions of large job shortages in Canada, as well as views that today’s youth will be part of a “lost generation.” While the report found no evidence of an imminent job crisis, it does make suggestions as to how Canada can make its labour market more efficient.

Immigrant Self-Employment and Enterpreneurship

A growing shortage of nursing professionals is expected to occur in Canada over the next decade. Internationally trained nurses could ease this shortage, but a system is needed to license them in language competence. The Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks (CCLB) has launched a two-phase project to meet this need. The results of the first phase are outlined in this report.

Occupational Benchmarking Research

This AMSSA Info Sheet, Issue 29, draws on the large body of research on the subject of immigrant entrepreneurship to explore the experiences of immigrants in self-employment. It examines the benefits and barriers to self-employment for immigrants and offers strategies for facilitating immigrant entrepreneurship. Resources to support newcomers in starting a small business are provided.

Mentoring Practices in Europe and North America: Strategies for Improving Immigrants’ Employment Outcomes

This report, commissioned of MPI Europe by the King Baudouin Foundation, highlights a number of relevant “classic” one-on-one mentoring practices in Europe and North America, focusing on the role of different initiators and stakeholders, forms of collaboration, methods, and target groups. It focuses exclusively on apprenticeship and business or employment-related mentoring efforts that aim to generate sustained employment. The report also provides a case study of mentoring practices in Belgium, where the unemployment rate of people with an immigrant background is significantly higher than that of the native born.

 

Website for Volunteers Working with Refugees – Centre for Canadian Langauge Benchmarks

Managers of language programs can direct volunteers working with refugees to this resource page from the Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks to better support refugees in the classroom.

Canadian Language Benchmarks for Study and Work

These booklets provide an understanding of the language proficiency levels required to work and study in Canada. They come in versions for learners and ESL practitioners and include an introduction to the Canadian Language Benchmarks and how they relate to language training, post-secondary studies and employment in Canada.

Can Do Statements – CLB

Can Do Statements were developed to help people understand the 12 Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB), which are used to indicate how well someone uses English to express ideas and understand others. The benchmarks are for listening, speaking, reading and writing.

Language for Work: CLB Essential Skills for ESL Instructors

Many newcomers to Canada already have some essential skills in English. This guide is intended for ESL instructors who wish to use Essential Skills in the ESL classroom to enrich and support language acquisition, as well as communicative competence. It also provides ESL instructors with lesson planning resources, tips and ideas.

Canadian Language Benchmarks Online Self-Assessment (CLB-OSA)

The CLB-OSA is an online self-assessment tool for people who are interested in assessing their English as a Second Language (ESL). These tests are based on the Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) and will assess your language proficiency in reading and listening.

NEW Language Assessment Tool – Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC)

ICTC has developed a set of tools that will help Internationally Educated Professionals (IEPs) understand language requirements, assess their Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level in English (and/or French) and overcome language and workplace communication challenges.

An Occupational Language Analysis

An Occupational Language Analysis (OLA) defines the standard English and French language requirements of an occupation based on occupation-specific tasks. An OLA defines the Canadian Language Benchmarks levels required to perform tasks related to specific jobs as defined in the Essential Skills Profiles and additional information found in the National Occupational Standards.

“Language for Work” Series

The following publications were developed in 2009 as part of a project called Tools and Resources to Support the Use of Essential Skills and Canadian Language Benchmarks.

Language Skills and the Social Integration of Canada’s Adult Immigrants

Skills in an official language (English or French) significantly affect the economic integration of Canada’s immigrants, including their employment levels and incomes. Official language skills also impact on how well immigrants integrate socially in their workplaces and communities. This study examines the relationship between official language knowledge and the social integration of adult immigrants to Canada.

What are B.C.’s most valuable university degrees?

The Vancouver Sun has developed an interactive tool that uses Statistics Canada income data to determine B.C.’s most valuable degrees. It also includes an online calculator that shows median incomes for people like you and a list of incomes by demographics.

Country Education Profiles

These resources have been developed by academic credential assessors to help individuals, employers, and organizations make informed decisions about international academic credential assessments.

Caring for Kids New to Canada

A guide that helps health professionals care for immigrant and refugee children, youth and families.

Caring for Syrian Refugee Children

A program guide for welcoming young children and their family.

Interactive Tool to Compare Rates of ESL, Special Needs and Gifted Children

This interactive tool, created by the Vancouver Sun, compares rates of ESL, special needs and gifted children in B.C.’s schools.

The Child’s Right

Every Child deserves the right to grow into a healthy and capable adult, regardless of where they live or who their parents are. In a world facing increasing challenges, it is essential to protect the rights of our children. By protecting them, we can protect their futures.

ImmigrantSeniorsBC-2010

Based on data from the 2006 Census, immigrant seniors represent 41.2 per cent of B.C.’s total senior population. This report focuses on the immigrant senior population in B.C. that may have immigrated decades earlier. It also focuses on newly arrived immigrant seniors, who became permanent residents of Canada at age 65 or over between 2005 and 2009.

Immigrant Youth and Children in British Columbia and Canada

This section of AMSSA’s website provides resources to assist with the Settlement needs of immigrant and refugee children and youth in the Province of BC and in Canada overall.

Students from Refugee Backgrounds: A Guide for Teachers and Schools

This guide is for teachers and other school staff. It has three goals:
1) to provide background information about those with refugee experience
2) to support all school staff in their work with children and youth from refugee backgrounds
3) to offer strategies for teachers working with these children and youth

Age at Immigration and the Education Outcomes of Children

This research draws a connection between age of arrival in Canada and risk of immigrant children not completing high school. The analysis in this paper focuses on how the education outcomes of a child might differ if he or she had migrated at a different point in the life cycle. It also seeks to determine how migration affects the overall wellbeing of children.

Childhood Immigration and Acculturation in Canada

Immigrant children are far more likely to experience social and economic disparity than their Canadian-born counterparts. This research looks at how immigrant children at elevated risk for mental health problems, relative to non-immigrant children. It also examines the individual and contextual factors that influence mental health problems among immigrant children.

An Examination of the Settlement Pathways of Newcomer Youth

The research provides a first-hand account on how 125 newcomer youth from 30 countries navigated through their everyday lives in Canada. Such accounts will better inform agencies on effective and culturally responsive services and programs for immigrant and refugee youth.

Immigrant Children and Youth in Focus

This article outlines the needs of immigrant children and youth in the areas of social services, health and education and at home, school and in community environments in which these needs arise. It also discusses challenges in providing services to immigrant children and youth and outlines opportunities for policy and service development.

Reversal of Fortunes or Continued Success? Cohort Differences in Education and Earnings of Childhood Immigrants

This study looks at whether children of recent cohorts of immigrants have experienced a deterioration in education levels and earnings and questions whether this deterioration could be connected to their parents’ labour market outcomes.

Philippine Youth in Canada

This report outlines the demographic, residential, economic, educational and occupational profile of Filipino youth in Canada.

What do we Know about Immigrant Seniors Aging in Canada? A Demographic, Socio-Economic and Health Profile

This report considers how immigrant seniors experience aging compared to the Canadian-born population in Canada using 2006 Census data. It explains how immigrant seniors experience more health issues than Canadian-born seniors due to limited social networks, language barriers and low income.

Stalled Development of Immigrant Filipino Youths: Migration, Suspended Ambitions and the ESL Classroom

This paper explores the educational experiences and issues of children of first-generation Filipino immigrants in Canada. It pays close attention to how newly arrived Filipino-Canadian youths describe their experiences of migration from the Philippines and their integration into Canadian schools.

Report: Improving Education for Migrant-Background Students: A Transatlantic Comparison of School Funding – Migration Policy Institute

This report focuses on four countries—Canada, France, Germany, and the United States—shedding light on supplementary funding mechanisms targeted to migrant-background students, and some of the key challenges and strategies decision-makers are wrestling with as they attempt to ensure that additional resources are used effectively.

North Shore Demographics

17,760 immigrants

live in the City of North Vancouver
Source: 2011 Census

45.5% of immigrants

in the City of North Vancouver are from Iran, the Philippines, and the UK.
Source: 2011 NHS

39.6% of immigrants

in the City of North Vancouver speak non-official languages at home.
Source: 2011 NHS

61% of recent immigrants,

age 26-64, in the City of North Vancouver have bachelor's degrees or higher.
Source: 2011 NHS

24,970 immigrants live

in the District of North Vancouver
Source: 2011 Census

33% of immigrants

in the District of North Vancouver speak non-official languages at home
Source: 2011 NHS

Copyright © 2017 NSIIP.ca